Finding Your First Paddle

Written by John C., Director of Vendor Relations at PickleballCentral

So many of us have been introduced to the game of pickleball by friends, family or chance only to become hopelessly addicted. We start with borrowed paddles and soon can’t wait to get our very own. Then when we go shopping and are just overwhelmed with all the choices. How do you pick your very first pickleball paddle?

It starts with some basics. Have you played racquet sports in the past? Is there a different type of sport you have played? Or, is this your first foray into athletics? To all of you we say, “welcome to the wonderful world of pickleball!”

New to Sports/None of the Above – look for a great entry level paddle to get you started, there are many paddles that are low cost and make the game easier to play than the old wood paddles that are often used in schools (SLK Latitude, Engage Trident, Vulcan V330, PROLITE Illuminate 2.0, Rally Tyro 2, Oneshot X).

Tennis – look for a paddle from a trusted name in tennis (HEAD, Prince, ProKennex, Babolat, Wilson or Diadem) – the grips feel very familiar – or use our Oversized Pickleball Paddles Category to find a paddle that is slightly elongated that puts the sweet spot further from your hand, similar to a tennis racket (GAMMA Compass, Electrum Model E, Paddletek Tempest Reign Pro, Selkirk Vanguard Hybrid Invikta, and Oneshot Powershot are some of our popular elongated paddles at this time). You may also look at handle length if you favor any two-handed shots – anything 5 ½” or longer should work (Franklin Ben Johns Signature, HEAD Gravity LH, Engage Pursuit MX, Prince Quantum Pro and Vulcan V560 Control).

Badminton/Squash – look for a paddle that is long handled and head heavy (PROLITE Cypher Pro, Paddletek Sabre Pro, Selkirk Vanguard Hybrid Mach6)  and has the right size grip for you hand (check out our Paddle Guide to see three ways to measure it).

Racquetball – look for a paddle that is tear drop shaped with a high sweet spot (Onix Evoke Teardrop, Champion Graphite Elite, GAMMA Hellbender). You probably want a standard or short handle size (Selkirk AMPED Omni, Vulcan V550, HEAD Gravity SH).

Table Tennis – look for a paddle that can impart a lot of spin through texture or face material (Paddletek Tempest Wave Pro, Electrum Pro Graphite, PROLITE Titan, ProKennex Ovation Flight, Pursuit EX 6.0). You will probably feel comfortable with a short handle paddle that lets you get the most from a paddle while playing with a finger (or two) up on the face (Selkirk AMPED S2, GAMMA Typhoon, Onix Vertex).

Baseball/Softball – look for a paddle that is well balanced and has a large sweet spot to provide you success as you enter in to a racquet sport (Prince Response Pro, ProKennex Kinetic Pro Speed II, Diadem Icon, Paddletek Tempest Wave II, Babolat RBEL, Oneshot Pureshot Brian Ashworth).

The secret is to get started with a paddle that gives you a chance to find out what kind of player you are. An all-court paddle combines power for your long shots and touch for your short game. As you develop you can decide if you need more power (my shots are going into the net, my serve is not deep enough) or more control (I am constantly hitting the ball out, my dinks don’t go where I want them to). Like most of us, you will find that you go through a few paddles as your skill increases and you understand more about what different paddle characteristics do for your game.

A great place to start your research is our Paddle Guide, where these sections will help you narrow your choices and help you find your very first paddle:

And, if that doesn’t work, call us at 1-888-854-0163. We all play pickleball and went through exactly what you are going through now. Nothing makes us happier than helping you find a paddle that fits your game. And then you buy with confidence, knowing you have a 30-day test drive to make sure it works on the courts – that’s where it counts.

Why Wear a Pickleball Shoe?

Written by Kevin S., our in-house footwear expert and buyer

As pickleball continues to be one of the fastest growing sports we also see players evolve in their preference of gear. Just as many of us started playing with a wooden paddle until we saw the light and realized how much more control we got out of a composite paddle, we owe it to our feet to show them a similar jump in quality by switching out of a running shoe and putting on footwear specific to our sport. While there are no promises on an immediate improvement to your third shot drop with a pair of pickleball shoes on vs your typical running shoe, court shoes do provide improvements to stability, durability, and most importantly a reduced injury risk.

Let us start with the name: Is there a difference between a pickleball shoe, a tennis shoe, or a court shoe?

Easy answer here: No! You may have heard a few different terms used to describe the shoes you should wear while playing pickleball. The differences between them exist in name alone. As you may be aware, most people play pickleball on the same surface as a tennis court; with a big overlap in the range of motion needed from our footwear for each sport. Any tennis shoe is going to equip you perfectly for pickleball. For those who play on an indoor gym surface, a gum rubber shoe or a standard pickleball shoe are both suitable. Sometimes the term tennis shoe will refer to a general athletic shoe, so in place of this court shoe may be used to describe the footwear used for the sport. There is no reason so switch out of a tennis shoe and into a pickleball shoe, but many reasons to switch out of a trainer or running shoe and into a pickleball/tennis/court shoe.

Breaking down the benefits

Every running shoe and most trainers are designed for a limited range of motion: to go forwards and backwards. In pickleball almost every point is played with a great deal of lateral movement. Being able to pivot is very critical, and pickleball shoes are designed for just that. Putting your weight into the ball of your foot and trying to pivot left or right in a running shoe is fighting against the design of the shoe’s midsole, toe box, tread, and outsole. Losing this fight occurs when you twist your foot and instead of allowing this motion while keeping your foot stable, the shoe tips over and caves, easily leading to an ankle injury. You will often hear the term “stability” used with pickleball shoes and the idea is they allow for a range of motion, twisting, and pivoting while keeping your foot level and stable, avoiding risk of turning an ankle. A few design details help accomplish this goal.

  • Tread

The tread on the bottom of a pickleball shoe is most frequently a herringbone design, a term used to describe the squiggly pattern that lines the bottom of the shoe under the forefoot and heel. The tread of the shoe needs to allow you to start and stop quickly, pivot, lunge, backpedal, and exert your weight over many parts of the shoe. This is different from a running shoe that is designed for your weight to transfer only from your heel or midfoot to your toes in a natural running stride.

  • Stability Shank

To aid in keeping your foot stable, pickleball shoes feature a plastic shank that runs between the cushioning of your heel and the outsole. This shank runs from the back of the shoe up to about the forefoot and is visible from each side of the shoes and underneath. Some shoes also feature an additional plastic heel counter that restricts movement even further from your heel and ankle, a key component for anyone with prior ankle injuries looking for the most secure pickleball shoe they can get.

  • Drop

Running shoes often feature a slant called a heel toe drop, where the heel of the shoe is higher than the toe box. Most pickleball shoes feature close to a zero millimeter heel toe drop to allow you to pivot on your heels or forefoot without your weight being entirely distributed in one area or the other. This flat, low to the ground effect makes it hard to find a pickleball shoe with much arch support. A completely flat shoe is easier to pivot in than one with a heightened arch. Knowing many people require additional arch support to compensate for pronation, supination, or plantar fasciitis issues, all the insoles in pickleball shoes are removable, and able to be swapped with your own support insoles. We sell two insoles from Zelus, the Olympus Pro and Olympus Lite that offer a great combination of heightened arch support and cushioning. For someone needing a shoe with high arch support it is much safer to wear a pickleball shoe and put in a support insole rather than wearing a running shoe featuring a high arch.

  • Outsole

Another component of a pickleball shoe is the rubber used for the outsole that ensures durability over frequent use. This rubber is harder than the rubber in most athletic shoes and should stand the test of time against play and wear down at a much slower rate than a non-pickleball shoe.

Between a plastic shank and the hard rubber used to ensure durability pickleball shoes might not be as plush or soft as a running shoe but the benefits in stability, injury prevention, durability, and increased range of motion far outweigh the softer materials of a running shoe.

How to pick a pickleball shoe?

Every pickleball shoe will offer heightened stability, durability, and comfort compared to a normal athletic shoe. Pickleball shoe brands will often offer a very supportive and stable option as well as a lighter weight more comfort-oriented shoe. There are pros and cons to each and picking the one that fits your style of play is important. Using a lighter weight and softer rubber typically brings down the durability of a shoe. Adding a plastic heel counter for added support usually makes the shoe heavier overall. At the bottom of our Men’s and Women’s shoe pages is a shoe guide that lists information about each shoe that will help guide you in this decision.

Here you will see:

  • A classification of each shoe: Lightweight, Comfort, Durability, and Stability being the options
  • The weight of the shoe
  • The toe box width
  • Whether the shoe features a 6-month durability guarantee

As important as style is, we should consider these additional aspects of each shoe to pick the best pair for our pickleball needs.

To summarize

It takes little time to realize the benefits of upgrading from your first paddle; we should be aware of a similar improvement we can bring to our game by upgrading our footwear. You do not want to switch to a proper shoe only after you have experienced a predictable injury playing pickleball in a running shoe. It is not a piece of equipment reserved for the pro players while the rest of us are not good enough to feel the differences. Hopefully after reading along you understand the technology and differences in material used to construct a pickleball shoe and what benefits each component brings. Each brand makes pickleball shoes with different components all including a similar foundation. HEAD makes shoes with exceptional ventilation with their Sprint Pro, Revolt Pro, and Revolt EVO models. Wilson makes a shoe that sits as one of the most comfortable we carry while also being the lightest out of our lineup with their Kaos Swift. Babolat offers a wider fitting shoe with a very durable outsole with their SFX 3. K-Swiss has been a best-seller due to its elevated comfort, weight, and durability in their Express Light model. If you are curious at all of the differences between the shoes we offer or are looking for advice on how to select the shoe that will fit your game best, our customer service team is well trained to handle any and all inquiries to help make your buying experience easier. Stay tuned for more shoe content to come!

4 Amazing Long Points from Pickleball Matches You Have To Watch

They say that unforced errors are the key to the game, so in an ideal world pickleball points should last through endless hits as players return ball after ball. Of course, that’s not exactly how it plays out in real life, but among top level competitors you do end up seeing some truly epic rallies that last for over 50 strikes.

If you’d like to learn how to be more prepared, consistent and precise… or if you just want to see some pickleball action at its finest, watch these videos to see how pros keep the ball in play for as long as possible.

 

2018 Vegas Open 68 Shot Rally

This point is from the men’s doubles semi-final at the Las Vegas Pickleball Open. It involves Kyle Yates and Ben Johns vs. Callan Dawson and Tyler Loong. There are a nice mix of dinks and volleys as the players jockey to find openings and position their opponents. This match went to 3 games and they also faced one another in the gold medal match afterwards.

 

2019 Golden State Championships 174 Shot Rally

In this tense showdown Kyle Yates makes another appearance with Lindsey Newman as they face Jeff Warnick and Jessie Irvine. The point truly shows how much patience can make or break your game. Many of the hits are gentle and controlled as both sides wait for the other to make the tiniest mistake The point drags on in what may be one of the longest rallies ever! The final hit is unexpected as Warnick reaches near the center line to steal a ball out of the air and put it between his competitors.

 

2016 USAPA Nationals 55 Shot Rally

This video has the shortest amount of hits on the list, but it’s probably the most exciting. Wes Gabrielsen and Kyle Yates (should we deem him the Long Rally King?) battle against Matt Staub and Daniel Moore. The pace hardly lets up as these fantastic players alternate between calculated dinks and lightning fast volleys. It’s amazing that the point isn’t even lost as the players are drawn out of position, but because of an overly powerful shot that flies out of bounds!

 

2018 Practice Match w/ Glenn Lucey 67 Shot Rally

Glenn Lucey is something of a legend among the pickleball community for posting long and impressive rallies involving him and other pro players. Although his videos are “only” from practice matches, they’re no less passionate and fun to watch than those at tournaments. In fact, since the players are often taking more risks, you get to see some unique choices at times. Stick around after the long point to see Dave Wage go to his knees to rescue a ball—multiple times!

Get Free Pickleball Training at Home from Simone Jardim

Simone Jardim is one of pickleball’s top players and has won over 70 gold medals in competitions like the USAPA Nationals. Normally you’d have to attend her Peak Performance Pickleball Academy in Florida to receive training from her, and that would only be if you were lucky enough to catch her between her busy tournament schedule… but now you can practice with her for free from the comfort of your own home!

Starting in late March this year, Simone started posting a series of drill videos on Facebook. She’s going to livestream another drill set tomorrow, Thursday 4/2 at 6:30pm ET / 3:30pm PT. Watch her in real time and you’ll be able to ask questions and comment as she demonstrates. Be sure to tune in if you have the opportunity!

In the meantime, check out her prior videos so you can get up-to-date on these useful techniques. Most of these drills can be done alone but some can be done with a partner as well. You can even watch how Simone stretches and cool down to ensure proper care of your body after practice. These videos are all 40+ minutes long so you’ll get to enjoy some meaty strategy talks and demonstrations!

Simone Jardim – At-Home Pickleball Exercises – Part 1

Watch Now

In this 2nd video Simone discusses the importance of positioning around the kitchen, how you can read your opponents’ movements and the best ways to respond to different shots. Some of the Q&A focuses on footwork and describes common mistakes players make so that you can move more quickly and efficiently across the court.

Make sure you’re taking breaks and drinking water, as some of these drills can be intense and require quick actions. Go at your own pace to avoid injury and grow accustomed to new movements.

Simone Jardim – At-Home Pickleball Exercises – Part 2

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At the end of the third stream, Simone gave away a free Prince paddle—so all the more reason to watch her live tomorrow. That being said, if you watch this video you might hear about a special offer from Prince you can still use now…

Her warm-up in this video involves ladder work for your lower body and transitions into more wall drills that focus on placement and touch.

Simone Jardim – At-Home Pickleball Exercises – Part 3

Watch Now

Enjoy these wonderful workout/training videos and we hope to see you tomorrow on Facebook! Follow Simone today so you can join in the fun and improve your skills.

Top 5 Drill Videos to Improve Your Game

Playing pickleball with friends is always fun, but sometimes the best way to improve is simply to buckle down and work on drills. They can be repetitive, but if you focus on proper techniques during training, the same movements become second nature in competitive play.
So if you’re stuck at home right now, don’t let your skills get rusty! Get in the zone and hone your abilities so you’ll emerge better than ever when you reunite with fellow players.

The first video we have with pro player Glen Peterson is ideal for those who don’t have a lot of space and want simple but effective ideas for strengthening their game.

The others we’ve included make use of ball machines so you can work on a wider variety of skills, although if you don’t have enough room or budget for a ball machine, you can recruit a family member to send pickleballs your way instead!

Solo Wall Drills

In this video Glen shows how anyone can use a pickleball, paddle and wall to greatly improve consistency and accuracy. You’ll also want some brightly colored tape to mark off your target(s). You can start simple by attempting to hit 10 shots in the same place, then stretch it out to 100! These drills are simple in theory but difficult to master. Work on both forehand and backhand hits to become a more versatile player.
Tight quarters with these drills can actually be beneficial, as they’ll improve your reaction time when playing at the kitchen.

Third Shot Drive & 5th Shot Drop

Pickleball champ Simone Jardim uses a Tutor Machine to show how you can work a third shot drive into your game—a technique that has a high percentage of success so you can get to the NVZ in a controlled manner. The goal here isn’t to charge forwards, but to methodically move closer to the kitchen with each strike. You keep opponents on their back foot so you can get into a more advantageous position.
Simone recommends setting up targets for an easier visual reference. You can use brightly colored objects around your house, or work with tape, court lines or target rings.

Block Volleys

This is another drill that looks easy but requires a good amount of adjustment if you tend to tighten up when you see incoming volleys. By adjusting the grip on your paddle and softening your hands, you can completely take the power out of fast balls and set yourself up for a more controlled exchange at the kitchen. This is a great move to work into your arsenal if you’re tired of “bangers” and want to be able to reduce their dominance on the court. Instead of counterattacking, you’ll learn to reset the ball at your own pace.

Shot Patterns

You’ll want to prepare more court markers for this drill. The idea is to hit in an area where your opponent won’t be able to use their forehand and have access to a more aggressive play. Pay attention to your footwork as you get closer to the net before allowing yourself to put the ball away.

Recovery on Lobs

Lobs annoy many players almost as much as slams, but you don’t have to remain at their mercy. Work on body placement to retain vision and move backwards safely, which will allow you to return a shot much like the third-shot drop into the kitchen. Your opponent won’t be able to steal a free point and you’ll have more time to get back to the net.

What are some exercises and drills that have helped you take your game to the next level? Sometimes the simplest techniques are the most effective and we’d love to hear your input!

Easy Ways to Make Room for Pickleball at Home

Pickleball is a social sport and many may not be able to meet with their regular groups right now, but that doesn’t mean you have to give up practicing entirely. Whether you’re keeping to yourself or have family members to join in, there’s certain to be some type of equipment that will suit your needs, budget and space limitations.

Here are a few ideas you can implement to continue getting your pickleball fix from home:

If You Have a Lot of Space

If you can’t get to the court, then you can make the court come to you! Our portable net systems are reasonably priced and come USAPA-approved with standard dimensions (22’ wide, 34” tall in the center). They’re perfect for setting up in a driveway, garage, backyard or anywhere else you have a flat surface. Don’t let their size intimidate you—all of our systems are very simple to use and can be put together in minutes.

Portable nets come in a variety of weights so that you don’t have to worry about the hassle of transport and packing them down during inclement weather. “Heavier” systems still only average about 24 lbs and our lightest, the SwiftNet, is a mere 14 lbs!

When it comes to setting up court boundaries you also have a number of options ranging from something as permanent as paint to temporary options like tape, chalk and court lines.

The USAPA has a handy guide on how to plot out court dimensions for proper marking using a measuring tape. Click here to read more and watch the video.

If You Have Less Space

If you don’t have as much room to spare, don’t count yourself out of getting a net right away—a mini net might be your best option.

Mini nets are portable systems approximately half the size of a standard net (around 10’ wide). They’re great for practice and can even be used to play “skinny singles.”

With just one other player, you can play a typical game using your slimmer net. This is actually a great way to get into singles for players who usually find it too taxing on the body when they have to cover a standard-sized court. Skinny singles can help make you more consistent, allow you to work on your serve and third-shot drop, and get a great workout.

Mini Nets have a similarly “mini” price compared to the average portable net, so they’re a great way to keep your costs low when it comes to buying equipment. You can use the same affordable methods above to mark out your court boundaries including the base line, sides and no-volley zone.

Mini Net

If You Have Little Space

Maybe you live in a small apartment, share a house or otherwise can’t find the room for a 10’ wide net. That’s okay too! You might not be able to play with a net, but you can still practice technique and drills.

While it’s perfectly acceptable to practice with only a paddle and pickleball, there are a number of convenient accessories that can make the process easier. The following is an example of a pickleball skill challenge we set up, and while we made use of a full-sized court, you can use any individual component of this “obstacle course” in a smaller setting:

Our Rebounding Mini Targets provide a simple way to practice your aim or serve as a stand-in for a doubles partner so you can work on positioning. The Pop-Up Targets are meant to attach to a net, but you could also set them up using objects around your house. Target Rings can be placed on the floor to perfect your precision.

You can also make use of court lines in nontraditional ways such as laying them out to serve as targets or placing them in unique ways to create agility drills.

We hope everyone is staying safe and that these ideas might spur some of your own practice. If you’ve had more time at home lately, we’d love to hear what creative ways you’ve made use of your space to get in some pickleball.

Paddle Sales from Big Manufacturers You Won’t Want to Miss Out On

In a time when many of us are keeping ourselves and others safe by staying isolated, portable nets and other products you can use at home are an enticing prospect. A paddle upgrade may not be at the top of your mind, however many paddle manufacturers have recently rolled out generous sales to entice buyers.

If you’ve ever been curious about trying out one of the bigger brand names but didn’t want to pay full price, or if you’re looking for more paddles to supply family members at home, now is a great time to take advantage of these deals.

Pickleball group

It’s a great time to find a paddle for everyone! (Credit: Senior Center at Northwood)

Remember that at PickleballCentral we have a 30-day test drive policy where you can purchase any paddle and use it for 30 days free of obligation. If you don’t decide you love the paddle within that time, just send it back and we’ll give you a full refund. Normal signs of usage are completely acceptable so long as there’s no extensive damage such as breaks or dents from improper play.

The following is a list of manufacturers currently running sales. Some of these will only be available while supplies last, and other have uncertain end dates, so be sure to jump on these offers while they’re here!

Engage: Many paddles 30% off. All Engage paddles have a limited lifetime warranty against manufacturer defects and workmanship.

Gamma: Needle, RZR Graphite, Mirage Composite and Dart (Standard and Pink Ribbon Edition) all 20% off.  Paddles have a 1-year warranty against manufacturing defects.

Paddletek: Free paddle cover ($16.99) with purchase of paddles. All paddles have a limited lifetime warranty against defects.

Pickle-ball Inc: $10-25 off most models. Up to $62 savings on 2-paddle bundles. 1-year warranty.

ProLite: Covert, Chrome N-R-G, Surface NRG, Cypher Pro and Rebel PowerSpin range from $14-30 off. Paddles have a 1-year warranty covering workmanship.

Selkirk: Entire AMPED line 20% off and Neo Composite Bundle on sale at 16% off. AMPED line has a lifetime warranty and Neo paddles have a 1-year warranty.

TOPP: All paddles $20 off. Lifetime warranty against defects.

Wilson: Profile Graphite, Surge Lite, Surge Pro, Tour, Tour Pro and Energy Pro all 35% off. 6-month warranty.

Jigsaw Health Supports Your Body’s Performance So You Can Play Pain-Free, Longer

We are excited to share that PickleballCentral is now carrying health supplements to help you stay strong throughout your games and recover faster afterwards. Our products come from the company Jigsaw Health, a group who cares about real, measurable results and high quality ingredients.

Jigsaw’s focus primarily centers around magnesium, a mineral that many individuals are deficient in without realizing it. Magnesium was the key to improved health for one of the company’s founders, Pat Sullivan. His co-founder and son, Patrick, took some time to introduce their work and share why it could be an important part of your health “puzzle” as well.

Jigsaw Logo

Jigsaw not only provides impressive products but has a great sense of humor, too! Read on to see some of the hilarious videos they’ve made and find out more about how their supplements can improve your quality of life:

How did you get involved in the world of pickleball and what are you looking to provide to players through your products?

My wife and business partner—Ashley—and I stumbled into pickleball in the summer of 2018 in Flagstaff, Arizona. Like so many others, we’ve been hooked ever since. Pickleball has been an unbelievably fun life enhancer for us!

Along the way we began to learn firsthand that pickleball can be a very physically demanding sport, especially in the tournament format where if you want a gold medal, you’ve got to play all day long to earn it.

We met a number of pickleball pros at PicklePalooza in August of 2019 including Kyle Yates, Lucy Kovola, Matt Wright, Irina Tereshenko, Jen & Steve Dawson, Adam Stone, Christine McGrath, Mills Miller and Dave Flemming. Several of them started taking our products to help increase energy and decrease cramping. And they got great results… good enough for them to start texting me a few months later to ask for a refill!

Everything has been a whirlwind since Nationals in 2019—we’ve sponsored 6 of the top pros in the game, and perhaps you’ve seen some of the fun commercials we’ve made with them? (To see all of Jigsaw’s funny videos, click here!)

We’ve become the exclusive hydration & nutrition sponsor of the PPA & APP Tours. We’re sponsoring several tournaments. We’re working with pickleball vacation companies and camps to provide their clients with hydration and recovery samples. We’ve had some amazing pickleball ambassadors begin to represent Jigsaw Health at their local courts.

Simply put, we’ve been very warmly embraced by the pickleball community at large. They see that a) we love pickleball too, and b) my dad has formulated some amazing products that work really well for pickleball addicts!

How did you first get involved in the supplements industry, and why did magnesium end up being such a large focus for you?

For nearly 30 years, my dad struggled with various health challenges—fatigue, insomnia, gastro-intestinal problems and depression. In 2004 he published a book called Wellness Piece by Piece chronicling his journey. And in 2005, we started Jigsaw Health together. One of the more important “puzzle pieces” he discovered was magnesium.

What are some ways people might be able to tell if they’re magnesium deficient?

One of the first symptoms of magnesium deficiency is muscle tension and nighttime leg cramps.

According to Medical News Today, 1 in 3 people over the age of 60 have leg cramps; 1 in 2 people over the age of 80 have leg cramps; and 40% experience leg cramps at least 3 times per week (Source: Medical News Today).

Magnesium is Mother Nature’s original “chill pill.” It’s a massage you can swallow. It’s like yoga in a bottle.

But even more than that, magnesium is actually the spark of life—the body can’t make ATP (energy) without magnesium, and there are over 300 biochemical reactions that require magnesium.

Would your magnesium products still be helpful to someone who isn’t magnesium deficient, or would you recommend a more general supplement like Electrolyte Supreme in that case?

It’s commonly cited that as much as 90% of the population is deficient in magnesium. A landmark study published in a 2004 edition of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition shows that between 1950 and 1999, over-farming and topsoil depletion led to nutrient reductions of up to 38% in 43 of the most common fruits and vegetables (Source: Scientific American).

So even if you’re eating a healthy diet, it’s still difficult to get all of the nutrients you need from food alone. Not just to avoid deficiency, but to live optimally.

Additionally, there are pharmaceuticals that have a little known side effect of depleting magnesium. According to Pharmacist Suzy Cohen, author of Drug Muggers, there are 14 classes of prescription drugs that “mug” your body of magnesium, including blood pressure drugs, acid blockers (PPIs), antacids, antibiotics, hormone replacement therapy (HRT), osteoporosis drugs, and cholesterol lowering statins, to name but a few (Source: Jigsaw Health).

For pickleballers who play frequently, we recommend Jigsaw Electrolyte Supreme™ to stay energized and hydrated, and Jigsaw MagSoothe™ for recovery and nighttime muscle cramps.

What are a few ways your company differs from the competition and ensures high quality?

You can see how Jigsaw Electrolyte Supreme™ stacks up to some of the more commonly used sugar-based electrolyte products at this link. (It provides more nutrients overall with no sugar.)

Anything else players should know?

It’s important for pickleballers to realize that there are actually two types of muscle cramps… when you cramp up during physical activity, that’s because your body is low in potassium. And when you wake up in the middle of the night grasping a painful charlie horse? That’s because your body is low in magnesium.

Jigsaw Electrolyte Supreme™ contains both potassium and magnesium, plus supporting vitamins to help you stay hydrated, energized, and cramp-free on (and off) the courts.

Jigsaw MagSoothe™ is an especially good form of magnesium to help prevent nighttime muscle cramps caused by a magnesium deficiency.

Our motto at Jigsaw Health: It’s FUN to feel good.

And our mission: To help pickleball addicts like you play “just one more game”… 5 or 6 more times!

Local Pickleball Guide – Ogden, Utah

Ogden is just a short drive north of Salt Lake City, and it’s a veritable hotbed of pickleball activity despite its snowy reputation—since it’s a gateway to many of Utah’s ski resorts. Ogden provides a picturesque view of the Wasatch Mountains along with easy access to many courts both indoors and out. The initial growth of pickleball in the area was largely thanks to avid player and philanthropist John Gullo.

Places to Play in Ogden, Utah

There are many courts in Utah available for free or for a small membership fee. See a selection of locations below. Visit the Ogden Pickleball Association or Utah Pickleball for additional options across the state.

Mt. Ogden Outdoor Courts – 1987 Constitution Way. Eight outdoor courts. Join open play Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturday 7:00am – noon, Tues and Thurs 5:00pm – dusk. Times may change due to Ogden’s outdoor leagues.
Monroe Park – Eight free outdoor courts. Lights for evening use. Reservable.
The Shed – Four indoor courts with an outdoor surface. Memberships available for free or low yearly costs on their site.
Marshall White Center – Indoor courts, cost is free with admission. Open play Tues – Thurs, hours on their site. Indoor leagues available.
Barnes Park – Eight outdoor courts, four of which have lights. Year-round leagues and two tournaments. Indoor play at nearby Kaysville Recreation.

USAPA Ambassadors: Utah

Wendy McKay — Ogden Valley  801-791-3001
Kyle Klein — Brigham City (~30 min N of Ogden)   435-730-3231, pickleballtoc@gmail.com
Oscar Garcia — Salt Lake City (~35 min S of Ogden)   801-604-0939
Michael White — Salt Lake City (~35 min S of Ogden)   828-514-9316
Shannon Wright — West Jordan (~50 min S of Ogden)    801-860-7776, shannonwrightpickleball@gmail.com
Victor Phillips — Cache County (~1 hr N of Ogden)    vh_phillips@comcast.net

Utah Court Construction Companies

Parkin Courts
Tennis and Track Co.
TD Sports West
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Ogden, Utah Pickleball Clubs

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Ogden Pickleball Association

Pickleball Tournaments Near Ogden, Utah

USA Pickleball Mountain Regional Championships (Brigham City)
Salt Lake County Summer Bash (Bluffdale)
Tournament of Champions (Brigham City)
Riverton Fall Classic 

For more events, take a look at Utah Pickleball’s tournament page.

Utah Pickleball Related News and Videos

The State of Pickleball
Ogden Philanthropist Moves Pickleball Tourney to Brigham City
How Pickleball Has Become One of Utah’s Fastest Growing Sports
Pickle Power! The Family-Friendly Sport That’s Taking Over Utah
Indoor Pickleball Courts Come to Roy with Outdoor Courts Expected This Summer
Pickleball Goes Outdoors in Salt Lake City

5 Ways to Protect Your Body and Recover Faster After Playing Pickleball

Pickleball is a fairly gentle sport, especially compared to higher impact games like tennis that necessitate covering a larger court. But injuries and accidents can happen during any activity, and no one wants to get waylaid by an injury right when their health is on the rise.

To ensure your body has adequate opportunity to heal and stay primed for your next game, here are some ideas to improve your recovery time:

Foam roller

Foam Rolling

Foam rollers are used for self myofascial release (SMR), which means they help eliminate trigger points or “knots” in the fascia (connective tissue). This allows for effective self massage that can relieve tension in a matter of minutes. With consistent use you can be on the way to working out tight areas that have been bothering you for years, and even if you don’t have chronic pain, it’s recommended that all active individuals use a foam roller to recover faster and keep muscles relaxed.

If you can tolerate tenderness and feel confident controlling the level of pressure, it’s best to purchase a harder roller with nubs to work the tissue on a deeper level. Rolling can feel very intense, but the impressive relief it provides is worth the temporary discomfort.

Rebounder

Rebounding

Rebounding is similar to jumping on a trampoline but is typically done on a smaller-sized apparatus. The exercise consists of either low bounces where your feet don’t leave the ground or full jumps. While it’s a simple motion, it can result in big benefits such as better lymphatic drainage, improved bone mass, better endurance and balance.

Rebounding was popularly studied in the 1980s when NASA was attempting to find a better way for astronauts to recover bone and muscle mass after being in space, so it’s been thoroughly vetted as an effective way to stay in top condition.

Resistance band

Resistance Bands

Resistance bands can be used for workouts on their own, but they’re also a useful tool for recovery since they don’t put as much pressure on the joints as heavy weights. In addition to improving stability and strength, they can also allow you to reach deeper stretches than wouldn’t be achievable solo.

Look up routines on Youtube to see how you can alter basic stretches with bands to better engage your muscles and sink deeper into each position.

Percussion massager

Percussion Massage

In the same category as foam rollers for SMR, percussion massagers take a slightly different approach to releasing adhesions by rapidly pulsing against them. This can be uncomfortable, but with proper use it shouldn’t be outright painful. When you come to an area that feels tight, you simply move the massager around the muscle to release tension.

Percussion massagers help your body ease away soreness from repeated movements (or inactivity) and reduce the risk of injury during play since you’ll feel more relaxed and flexible.

MagSoothe

Take Supplements

Your body can do a lot on its own, but sometimes a little support can make the difference between having a peaceful evening and dealing with fatigue, cramps, muscle soreness and other stressful problems. Depending on your needs, a supplement can help alleviate these issues so you can continue playing without negative side effects.

A common problem for pickleball players and athletes in general is cramping, especially in the legs. We recommend taking a look at Jigsaw Health’s MagSoothe if you deal with this issue. Their magnesium uses a highly bioavailable form of magnesium and formulates their supplement in such a way that it’s more easily transported throughout the body.

Do you use any particular tools, tricks or wisdom to get better rest and prepare for your next game? Let us know in the comments.